They call Montana "The Last Best Place" and for many, those words ring true. Montana is filled with prairies, mountains, wildlife, lakes, rivers, and roads and highways that go on for miles.

For those looking for adventure, Montana is one of the few places in the United States where a large portion of that state is left untouched, or at least it used to be.

In the last several years, tens of thousands of folks have decided to pack it up and head to Big Sky Country. The allure of living here is strong, as a result, Montana has seen its cities and towns grow at a pretty steady pace with certain areas of the state increasing in population rapidly.

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Of course, there are several mixed feelings about the "Montana Migration", in fact, for many locals, they aren't fans. They've watched as their way of life has changed as many local mom-and-pop stores are run out of town by big box stores and sprawling subdivisions. There is genuine anger amongst those who feel that the once friendly state is being overrun by those who look to relocate here while bringing their state's problems with them.

So, if you're one of those folks thinking about moving to Montana, we have some legitimate reasons why you should reconsider.

4 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Move To Montana

1. We have a housing issue here in Big Sky Country. In several parts of the state, there are not enough homes for the demand. Take Bozeman for example, a recent report stated that one of America's fastest-growing cities is about 10 thousand homes behind the demand. You read that right, 10 thousand homes.

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Credit: Canva
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Plus, the average price for a single-family home in Bozeman is roughly around a million dollars. Several other states have lovely views as well and much cheaper home values.

2. Lack of infrastructure. If you are from a more populated area, you'll find some of the conveniences you are used to might not be found here in The Treasure State. No, we don't have In-N-Out or Trader Joe's.

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Credit: Canva
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3. Winter sucks. Yes, the mountains in wintertime are magnificent and are the stuff of bookstore calendars, but winter can last up to 6 months and when you think it's over, it's not. The roads can be treacherous and if you're not used to driving in winter weather, it's probably best you stay away for your safety.

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Credit: Canva
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4. Lots of things live in Montana that can kill you. We've got bears, elk, bison, moose, mountain lions, and a slew of other critters that can not only hurt you but end your life. The last thing you want to do is come across a Mama Grizzly or Moose while you're out hiking. I mean, let's be honest, that would be a terrible way to go.

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Credit: Canva
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Don't get me wrong. Montana is a lovely place to visit.

We have much to do and see here. You will find that most people are welcoming and friendly as long as they know you're just visiting. So please, come see us, spend money in our stores, enjoy our natural wonders, and take lots of pictures to post on social media...just make sure you have a round-trip ticket.

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Gallery Credit: Derek Wolf

Montana's 7 Poorest Cities Ranked

For many Montanans, it's a struggle to make ends meet. With the high cost of housing, several locals have found themselves between a rock and a hard place when it comes to just getting by. Throw in the fact that prices are on the rise in almost every aspect of our lives and it's not too hard to see why so many Montanans are frustrated and are looking to leave The Treasure State.. Let's take a look at the state's 7 poorest cities according to Stacker.

Gallery Credit: Derek Wolf

LOOK: The 25 least expensive states to live in

Here are the top 25 states with the lowest cost of living in 2022, using data Stacker culled from the Council for Community and Economic Research.

Gallery Credit: Aubrey Jane McClaine